Bicycle Statistical Data: Usage, Productions and Sales

 


 


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Hard facts on bike usage, production, sales, imports, exports and trade are
hard to come by. Many of the best statistics are buried in papers that are presented at conferences
such as VeloCity, ProBike and the Transportation Research Board (TRB). Sometimes these
papers are published after the conferences but it can then be difficult to get a
hold of the proceeding, and then they aren’t very well indexed so you have to go
through all of all of them to extract anything that might be useful to you.

We do not have the staff to be able to research this thoroughly. If you are able to
find a good source of information please let us know so that we can share it with others.

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Tracking Global Bicycle Ownership Patterns
, Journal of Transport & Health,
Dec 2015.

Related article
.

Bicycle Frame Market – Global Trends, Market Share, Industry Size,
Growth, Opportunities, and Market Forecast – 2015 – 2022

Report on the economic potential
of bicycles
in developing countries.

Bicycling in Copenhagen
infographic
with history and statistics.

Bike Commuting In a Motorized World
infographic (mostly USA data).

Separated Bike Lanes = Safer Streets for Everyone
infographic
(mostly USA data).


World Bicycle Production, 1950-2007
(graph)

Bicycle production fell to 79 million units in 1998, 25 percent below the
peak of 107 million bicycles in 1995.  Source: State of the World 2001,
World Watch Institute, Washington DC USA

Percent of Trips by Travel
Mode (all trip purposes)

Country bicycle walking public transit car other
Netherlands 30 18 5 45 2
Denmark 20 21 14 42 3
Germany 12 22 16 49 1
Switzerland 10 29 20 38 1
Sweden 10 39 11 36 4
Austria 9 31 13 39 8
England/Wales 8 12 14 62 4
France 5 30 12 47 6
Italy 5 28 16 42 9
Canada 1 10 14 74 1
United States 1 9 3 84 3
Source: John Pucher,
Transportation Quarterly,
1997, Volume 51, Number 4, page 32 (from various transport ministries and depts., latest avail. year)

 

Bicycle mileage per person and killed cyclists per mileage in ten countries;
Source: WALCYNG, Report1. no.4, 1997, Lund University Sweden and Factum Austria

Bicyclists’ safety increases with increased bicycling in developed countries..


Bicycle Kilometres and Killed Cyclists per kilometre


Cycling kilometres per person per day

Killed
cyclists per 100 million kilometres

GREAT
BRITAIN

0.1

6.0

ITALY

0.2

11.0

AUSTRIA

0.4

6.8

NORWAY

0.4

3.0


SWITZERLAND

0.5

3.7

FINLAND

0.7

5.0

GERMANY

0.8

3.6

SWEDEN

0.9

1.8

DENMARK

1.7

2.3

THE
NETHERLANDS

3.0

1.6

By Wittink, Roelof; I-ce Interface for Cycling Expertise:
Planning for cycling supports road safety; In: Sustainable Transport, Planning
for walking and cycling in urban environments, ed. Rodney Tolley; Woodhead
publishing in Environmental management, ISBN 1 85573 614 4; 2003

World Bicycle and Automobile Production, 1950-2000

World Bicycle
and Automobile Production, 1950-2000

Year

Bicycle Production

Auto
Production

Auto Fleet
 

Million Units

1950

11

8

53

1951

11

7

 

1952

12

6

 

1953

13

8

 

1954

14

8

 

1955

15

11

73

1956 16

9

 
1957

17

10

 
1958

18

9

 
1958

19

11

 
1960

20

13

98

1961

20

11

 
1962

20

14

 
1963

20

16

 
1964

21

17

 
1965

21

19

140

1966

22

19

148

1967

23

19

158

1968

24

22

170

1969

25

23

181

1970

36

23

194

1971

39

27

207

1972

46

28

220

1973

52

30

236

1974

52

26

249

1975

43

25

260

1976

47

29

269

1977

49

31

285

1978

51

31

297

1979

54

31

308

1980

62

29

320

1981

65

28

331

1982

69

27

340

1983

74

30

352

1984

76

31

365

1985

79

32

374

1986

84

33

386

1987

98

33

 
1988

105

34

 
1989

95

36

 
1990

92

36

 
1991

99

35

 
1992

102

36

 
1993

102

34

 
1994

105

35

 
1995

106

35

 
1996

98

37

 
1997

92

39

 
1998

76

38

 
1999

96

40

 
2000

104

41

 
2001

97

   
2002

104

   
Source:
Historical data series compiled by Worldwatch Institute, Vital Signs
1996, 2002, 2005 (New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 1996, 2002).

As can be seen from the figures, global automobile production very nearly
caught up to bicycles in terms of total numbers by the late 1960’s, but since
then bicycle production has far outstripped that of automobiles and now stands
at better than a 3:1 ratio; so while bike sales may be steady or declining in
America over the past few years, they continue to make enormous gains in other
parts of the world–particularly Asia where China alone is now producing more
bikes (40+ million per year) than all the world’s automotive output.

Note also that while the global automobile fleet has expanded from less than 150
million to nearly 500 million over the past 30 years, during that same time over
2 billion bikes were manufactured, and the number of
utilitarian/transportation cyclists around the world has grown to over 1 billion
(of which China now represents about half the total).

Bicycle
and other cycle, not motorized production, by Country (latest year
available)
Country Year Unit Value Footnotes
Algeria 2004 Thousand Units 2.7  
Armenia 2008 Thousand Units 0.4  
Azerbaijan 2007 Thousand Units 200  
Bangladesh 2006 Thousand Units 27.638 1
Belarus 2008 Thousand Units 250.282  
Belgium 2003 Thousand Units 173.3 3
Brazil 2008 Thousand Units 2850.427  
Bulgaria 2008 Thousand Units 474.453  
Cameroon 1995 Thousand Units 0.801  
Canada 1997 Thousand Units 912.59  
Central African Rep. 1995 Thousand Units 0.65  
Chad 1995 Thousand Units 2  
Chile 2008 Thousand Units 79.228  
China 2008 Thousand Units 63748.7  
Colombia 1999 Thousand Units 54.109 4
Croatia 2003 Thousand Units 0  
Cuba 2008 Thousand Units 53.3  
Czech Republic 2008 Thousand Units 304.634  
Denmark 2008 Thousand Units 120.445  
Egypt 2000 Thousand Units 3  
El Salvador 1997 Thousand Units 2.421  
Finland 2008 Thousand Units 23.005  
France 2003 Thousand Units 12372  
Georgia 1996 Thousand Units 0.951  
Germany 2008 Thousand Units 1866  
Greece 2004 Thousand Units 159.711 6
Hungary 2008 Thousand Units 356  
India 2007 Thousand Units 11397  
Indonesia 2002 Thousand Units 2064  
Iran(Islamic Rep. of) 2000 Thousand Units 185 7
Iraq 2008 Thousand Units 0.576  
Ireland 2004 Thousand Units 0  
Italy 2004 Thousand Units 3982.579  
Japan 2008 Thousand Units 2200.807  
Kazakhstan 2007 Thousand Units 0  
Korea, Republic of 2005 Thousand Units 2.249  
Kyrgyzstan 2008 Thousand Units 0  
Latvia 1999 Thousand Units 2.098  
Lithuania 2008 Thousand Units 392.73  
Mexico 2008 Thousand Units 1601.6  
Mozambique 1997 Thousand Units 0  
Myanmar 2007 Thousand Units 53.878  
Netherlands 2007 Thousand Units 971 9
Pakistan 2008 Thousand Units 535.519 1
Peru 2005 Thousand Units 23.29  
Poland 2008 Thousand Units 1432.4  
Portugal 2006 Thousand Units 705  
Romania 2007 Thousand Units 277  
Russian Federation 2008 Thousand Units 1434  
Serbia and Montenegro 2003 Thousand Units 2.544  
Slovakia 2008 Thousand Units 56.958  
Spain 2001 Thousand Units 491  
Sweden 2008 Thousand Units 154.7724  
Turkmenistan 1997 Thousand Units 0  
Ukraine 2008 Thousand Units 381.292  
United Kingdom 2007 Thousand Units 0  
Viet Nam 2008 Thousand Units 1689  
         
Footnote        
1 Twelve months ending 30 June of year stated.
2 Provisional or estimated figure.
3 Incomplete coverage.
4 Including tricycles.
5 Including delivery tricycles.
6 Excluding Prodcom code 35.42.10.30.
7 Factory employing 10 or more persons.
8 Government production only.
9 Sales.
Source: Industrial Commodity Statistics Database | United
Nations Statistics Division

It is difficult to compare these numbers because many countries don’t report
every year and some countries don’t report at all.  They also don’t reflect
trends in specific countries, which may be towards increased production or
decreased production.  Trend information is available by filtering for a
specific country at
http://data.un.org/Data.aspx?d=ICS&f=cmID:49921-0

Bicycle
Production of Selected Countries, 1990-2000
  1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000
 

Million Units

China

31.9

36.8

40.3

41.0

42.0

41.0

38.0

30.0

23.1

42.7

52.2

France

1.5

1.2

1.0

1.0

1.3

1.3

1.3

1.3

1.6

1.8

1.9

Germany

3.9

4.9

4.6

4.1

3.5

3.2

2.9

2.8

3.2

3.2

3.2

India

8.4

8.8

9.0

9.9

10.5

11.5

11.3

11.0

10.5

11.0

11.0

Indonesia

2.0

2.0

2.2

2.5

2.8

3.0

2.3

3.0

2.8

2.6

N/A

Italy

3.5

3.6

4.1

5.2

5.8

5.3

4.0

4.0

3.0

3.3

3.2

Japan

8.0

7.5

7.3

6.9

6.7

6.6

6.1

6.0

5.9

5.6

4.7

Korea

1.5

1.5

1.3

1.1

1.2

N/A

0.9

0.8

0.6

0.6

N/A

Malaysia

0.3

0.4

0.6

0.7

0.8

0.8

0.5

0.8

0.7

0.8

N/A

Taiwan

6.8

7.7

7.5

7.9

9.2

9.7

7.4

11.9

10.1

8.3

7.5

Thailand

0.7

0.8

1.0

1.0

1.1

1.8

1.5

1.8

1.6

1.5

N/A

United
Kingdom

1.3

1.2

1.2

1.1

1.2

1.2

1.2

1.3

1.2

1.3

1.2

United
States

5.6

7.6

8.9

7.7

7.3

8.8

8.0

6.0

2.5

1.7

1.1

N/A
indicates not available.
Source:
Bicycle Retailer & Industry News Directory, from Cycle Press,
European Bicycle Manufacturers Association, Japan Bicycle Promotion
Institute, Bike Europe, and Bicycle Retailer & Industry News.

 

United
States Bicycle Market, 1991-2000
Year Total
Shipments
Imports Domestic
Production
 

Million Units

1991

15.1

6.5

8.6

1992

15.4

6.3

9.1

1993

16.8

7.1

9.7

1994

16.7

7.0

9.7

1995

16.2

7.2

9.0

1996

15.5

7.5

8.0

1997

15.2

9.8

5.4

1998

15.8

13.8

2.0

1999

17.5

16.3

1.2

2000

20.9

20.2

0.7

Source:
Bicycle Retailer & Industry News Directory, from The Bicycle
Council, U.S. Department of Commerce, and Bicycle Retailer &
Industry News.

 

Selected
Bicycle Promotion Initiatives Around the World
Compiled
by Janet Larsen, Earth Policy Institute, July 2002.
City Country Initiative
     
  Australia Plans to
double bicycle use by 2004 by developing a network of trails,
end-of-trip facilities, improving bicycle safety.
Santiago Chile 30-40
kilometer bike path pilot project currently funded by the Global
Environment Facility could grow to 1,000 kilometers over 10 years.
Bogotá Columbia Some 300
kilometers of bicycle paths have been completed; all cars are banned
from 120 kilometers of the city’s main streets on Sundays and holidays;
referendum was passed to prohibit car circulation during rush hours by
2015.
  France The
French Environment Ministry, together with the Transportation Ministry,
created a national bicycle plan in 1994, granting near $2 million for 10
bicycle promotion projects based on the Dutch model.
  Germany Over
31,000 kilometers of paths and lanes exclusively for bicycles.
Tokyo Japan Cost of
owning a car is high: fuel taxes double those of the United States
account for almost half of the price of gas; automobile tax levies and
vehicle inspection fees amount to an average of almost $2,000 annually.
Nagoya Japan Employer
contributions for commuting by bicycle doubled in 2000, while allowances
for automobile commuters were halved.
  Netherlands First
country to establish an official national bicycle policy; currently
almost 19,000 kilometers of paths and lanes exclusively for bicycles.
Lima Peru Low-interest
loans available to low-income families for the purchase of the bicycle
are helping the city to meet its goal to increase percent of trips by
bicycle from 2 percent in the mid 1990s to 10 percent. Over 60
kilometers of bike paths have been built along major traffic corridors.
  United
States
Almost $3
billion in federal funding allocated for bicycle and pedestrian projects
between 1998 and 2003 under the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st
Century.

UKDOT Journey Times Survey 1996

(ISBN 0 11 551926 2), published by the Stationery Office and featured in DOT
Press Release 106 of 28.5.96. The findings include:-

  • For journeys entirely within Central London, the average
    time was 33 minutes by car compared with 18 minutes by bike. By public transport
    the journeys took, on average, 31 minutes by rail and 38 minutes by bus. Taxi
    journeys took 20 minutes on average.
  • The average direct distance (as the crow flies) for the
    short radial journeys was 3.9 miles, and for the central journeys 1.7 miles.
    However, the actual distances traveled were much longer. For example, the
    average on-road distance for short radial journeys by bike was 5.2 miles, and by
    car was 5.6 miles for central journeys these distances were 2.3 miles for bikes
    and 2.7 miles for cars.
  • The proportion of time spent “in-vehicle” varied
    considerably by mode; from 97% for short radial bike journeys to only 30% from
    central rail journeys

The report includes comparisons with the same journeys
surveyed in 1993. For all modes, except the bike, the 1996 journeys were slower
on average than the 1993 journeys. The changes reported are subject to a number
of influences (such as choice of routes and parking places, and worse weather in
1996), in addition to changes in congestion.

  • For short radial journeys, the fastest made in 1996 was
    bicycle, and the slowest was bus, as in 1993, but bicycle was slightly faster in
    1996.
  • In contrast to other modes, there were overall reductions
    in time for both short radial and central bike journeys, by 8% and 5%
    respectively.

This is interesting firm evidence of the increasing
advantages of bikes over other modes as congestion continues to worsen. 
(Hugh McClintock, 1996)

Mode Space Requirements

One single-occupant car requires 75 times the amount of urban space as a pedestrian, 20
times that of a cyclist, and 13-40 times that of rail transit per unit of personal
movement achieved (Professor John Whitelegg, 1993)

True Costs of Road Transport

In 1993 Professor David Pearce and colleagues analyzed the external societal costs of
UK road transport and came up with an annual figure of £22.25
billion (US$ 35.6 billion).

In “Blueprint Five: The True Costs of Road Transport” they have revisited
their findings and made substantial upward adjustments. There are much higher levels for
noise (£3 billion annually) and congestion (£19 billion). New information about the danger of particulate
– especially PM10’s from diesel – has led to a substantial upward revision
in the cost of air pollution. Taken in total, Pearce and company now believe, the annual
cost to society imposed by road transport to be £46-53
billion.

“Blueprint Five” is published by Earthscan at £10.95.
[CTC Cycle Digest] (1998)

1996 US State Traffic Satety Stats

Compiled by Riley Geary, from data of the National Center for Statistics and Analysis, a part of
the NHTSA.  They now have a state-by state summary of traffic safety
statistics
at: 

http://www-nrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/departments/nrd-30/ncsa/STSI/USA%20WEB%20REPORT.HTM

[Note the meaning of these numbers generated a lively discussion on several list servers!]

$B

Deaths

$/D

/VMT

/Pop

%P

%B

%>.10

%Spd

SB:D%

SB:U%

10yr

3yr

AL

2

1143

1.7

22

26.8

8

0.5

34

37

29

54

+

+

AK

0.3

80

4

19

13.2

10

5

43

38

31

69

AZ

2.5

993

2.5

24

22.4

16

2.9

35

29

39

63

.

++

AR

1.4

615

2.3

22

24.5

4

0.8

26

37

29

48

.

+

CA

15.6

3989

3.9

14

12.5

20

3.1

31

35

60

88

CO

1.8

617

2.9

17

16.1

12

1.5

34

42

37

59

.

+

CT

2.1

310

6.8

11

9.5

16

1.3

39

28

27

62

DE

0.4

116

3.3

15

16

17

2.6

29

22

55

68

.

DC

0.5

62

8.1

19

11.4

33

1.6

35

47

32

58

+

+

FL

8.9

2753

3.2

21

19.1

20

3.9

29

25

41

64

.

+

GA

4.3

1574

2.7

18

21.4

10

1

28

23

35

62

.

+

HI

0.6

148

4.3

18

12.5

20

3.4

29

36

53

80

+

+

ID

0.5

258

2

20

21.7

5

1.2

27

39

36

54

.

+

IL

6.4

1477

4.3

15

12.5

14

1.9

35

32

37

64

+

IN

3

984

3

15

16.8

8

0.6

27

21

39

62

.

+

IA

1.4

465

3

17

16.3

5

2.4

34

13

50

75

.

.

KS

1.3

491

2.5

19

19.1

4

0.4

30

27

32

54

.

+

KY

2.1

841

2.5

20

21.6

6

0.8

28

27

32

55

.

.

LA

2.7

901

3

23

18

14

2

40

20

41

67

ME

0.7

169

4

13

13.6

10

0.6

29

44

40

50

MD

3.4

608

5.6

13

12

21

1.3

23

15

58

70

MA

4

417

9.6

8

6.8

18

1.7

32

26

26

54

MI

5.5

1505

3.7

17

15.7

13

2.2

32

25

52

71

+

MN

2

576

3.5

13

12.4

8

1

31

27

43

64

.

.

MS

1.3

811

1.6

27

29.9

6

0.6

34

17

22

46

+

.

MO

3.1

1149

2.7

19

21.4

8

0.3

39

40

31

62

.

+

MT

0.4

200

2.1

21

22.8

6

1

34

44

40

73

.

NE

0.9

293

3

18

17.7

6

1.4

26

30

34

63

.

+

NV

1

348

2.9

25

21.7

20

1.7

38

33

38

70

++

+++

NH

0.4

134

3.3

12

11.5

13

2.2

27

21

42

57

+

NJ

6.6

818

8.1

13

10.2

22

2.2

26

10

40

67

+

NM

1.1

481

2.3

22

28.1

13

0.4

42

36

40

85

.

+

NY

13.2

1564

8.4

13

8.6

24

2.9

24

24

46

74

NC

4.7

1493

3.1

19

20.4

11

2.5

29

36

56

82

+

ND

0.2

85

2.5

13

13.2

5

0

44

52

19

43

OH

7.1

1395

5.1

14

12.5

9

1.2

26

25

41

62

OK

1.7

775

2.2

23

23.5

8

0.6

29

44

23

48

+

+

OR

1.4

524

2.7

17

16.4

12

1.5

31

26

58

85

.

PA

5.4

1469

3.7

15

12.2

15

1.7

32

36

40

71

RI

0.4

69

6.4

10

7

23

2.9

38

35

19

58

SC

2

930

2.2

23

25.1

11

1.9

33

47

43

61

+

SD

0.4

175

2

22

23.9

6

1.1

32

21

34

59

+

++

TN

3

1239

2.4

21

23.3

8

0.4

33

26

32

63

.

+

TX

11.2

3741

3

20

19.6

12

1.6

42

39

47

74

.

++

UT

0.9

321

2.8

16

16

10

2.8

18

28

36

60

.

+

VT

0.2

88

2.4

14

14.9

9

1.1

32

54

33

69

VA

3.3

875

3.8

12

13.1

13

1.1

31

27

34

70

.

WA

3.2

712

4.5

14

12.9

13

2

39

34

48

82

.

+

WV

1

345

2.9

14

18.9

7

1.2

33

29

43

58

WI

2.5

761

3.3

14

14.8

7

1.7

36

27

40

61

.

+

WY

0.3

143

2

19

29.7

6

2.1

30

40

29

72

+

US

150

41907

3.6

17

15.8

13

1.8

32

30

42

68

(+)

$B — Economic costs of all
traffic collisions (in billions of $)
Deaths — All fatalities caused by traffic collisions
$/D — ‘Cost’ per traffic fatality (in millions of $), where a higher
number indicates a larger relative % of nonfatal collisions
and generally higher insurance rates
/VMT — Traffic fatality rate per billion vehicle miles traveled
/Pop — Traffic fatality rate per 100,000 population
%P — Pedestrian % of traffic fatalities
%B — Bicyclist % of traffic fatalities
%>.10 — % of traffic fatalities involving blood alcohol content >=.10
%Spd — % of traffic fatalities involving excessive speed, according
to state police evaluations
SB:D% — % of motorist fatalities where victims used seat belts
SB:U% — ‘Observed’ % of motorists using seat belts
10yr — Long-term (10-year) trend in traffic fatalities
3yr — Intermediate-term (3-year) trend in traffic fatalities
  — = substantially lower
   – = somewhat lower
   . = neutral
   + = somewhat higher
  ++ = substantially higher

Figures also appear in many of the documents listed in the
IBF’s Bicycle / Development / Sustainability Bibliography /
Reading List

 

 

Source Article